HARVEST
1

HARVEST

Over 200 years of selectively handpicking coffee have taught us that this is the best way to select the ripest cherries. Nothing can replace the experience of trained coffee pickers. Recent research indicates handpicking coffee can be supported when pickers wear a device known as a “Canguaro”, which stops the cherries from falling to the ground and getting lost.

PULPING
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PULPING

The post-harvest stage is of great importance, both for the quality of the coffee and for wider conservation efforts. It’s important to minimise the amount of water that is used, both to support the environment and save money for the producer.

MUCILAGE REMOVAL
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MUCILAGE REMOVAL

First, the cherries are pulped, removing the flesh and fruit. After that, the best beans are selected, and the mucilage (a thin, sticky layer around the bean) is mechanically removed. The beans then move on to be dried. When using this system, many Colombian coffee growers have managed to reduce water usage to less than one liter per kilogram of cherries.

DRYING
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DRYING

Coffee can be dried either through direct exposure to sunlight, or through the use of a mechanical dryer. When drying coffee, it is important to retain somewhere between 10% and 12% of its moisture. If the beans’ moisture is above or below this range, it will affect the quality of the exported green coffee.

HULLING
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HULLING

Once dried, the parchment (a papery shell around the coffee bean) must be removed using a specialized machine, known as a huller. Once hulled, the green coffee beans are ready for export or industrial-scale processing.

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